It Is The Most Common Cause Of Vision Loss Among People With Diabetes And The Most Common Cause Of Blindness Among Working-age Americans.

High blood pressure in the arteries of the body can damage the retinal arteries and this is called hypertensive retinopathy.  Therefore, prevention is difficult. However, the type of diabetes a person has, how often their blood glucose fluctuates, how well controlled the sugars are, and how long a person has had diabetes all affects his or her risk. Glaucoma is a group of diseases that damage the eye’s optic nerve—the bundle of nerve fibbers that connects the eye to the brain. Central serous retinopathy — Most cases go away without any treatment within three to four months. http://dclakers.com/advisingeyesurgeon/2016/12/05/a-closer-look-at-strategies-of-cataracts/When a child is born too early, retinal blood vessels do not have time to finish growing properly. This technique is similar to ultrasound but uses light waves instead of sound waves to capture images of tissues inside the body. Premature and low-birth-weight infants should be screened for retinopathy of prematurity if they: Are born at less than 36 weeks of gestation Weigh less than 4 pounds 6 ounces at birth GOP can be caused by or get worse from inadequate or too much oxygen after birth. http://experteyedoc.macsverige.org/2016/12/05/uncovering-elementary-solutions-in-glaucoma/In some people with diabetic retinopathy, the blood that leaks from blood vessels in the retina may also leak into the vitreous humour, clouding vision. The better you control blood sugar levels, the lower your risk. Robertson D expert opinion.

All people with diabetes are at risk for diabetic eye disease. African Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and Hispanics/Latinos are at higher risk for losing vision or going blind from diabetic eye disease. Diabetic retinopathy poses the greatest risk to vision. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and the most common cause of blindness among working-age Americans. Over time, high blood sugar levels from diabetes affect the tiny blood vessels in the tissue in the back of the eye called the retina. Timely treatment saved her vision Ivey-Foster saw her eye doctor at once. Suber Huang, M.D., founder of the Retina Center of Ohio in Cleveland, discovered that Ivey-Foster could read none of the letters on the eye chart with her right eye. She had developed proliferative diabetic retinopathy, an advanced stage of the disease. New, abnormal blood vessels were growing on the surface of her retina and leaking bloodthe cause of her floaters.

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